Monday, November 13, 2017

The World I Want to See - AIC Student Visions

Students in Professor Nordell's Visual and Digital Arts classes received the following assignment:

As we have been discussing in class, art impacts society and society impacts art.  Therefore, making conscious decisions about what imagery to look at (ingest) is really important for human and artistic development.  In this spirit, think about what images you would like to see.  Imagine what you would like the world to look like.  For you, what is The World I Want to See? Spend some time thinking about this.  I suggest that you take some notes, write down some ideas, meditate on the question. 

Here are student creations:

Unity by Damahya Coeur 

"The world that I want to see is a world where there is diversity and love regardless of skin color. Everyone should be valued no matter their roots or where they come from. People should be able to come together to accomplish anything because history shows that union shows power!"

Libertarianism by Ethan Murray 

"The Porcupine often symbolizes the Libertarian Party.  I believe the theory behind it is that porcupines only attack when provoked.  Just as libertarians believe in personal freedoms and don't want individual rights infringed on."

#MikeBrown by Aryanna Lounds

"No Justice.  No Peace."

We Don't See Each By Race but Through Love - Qubilah Felix

"This picture is my family heading to church on Sunday. We took a family photo. What I loved about taking this picture is that my family is a melting pot of different cultures. Here you have my brother-in-law who is French, my nephew is Dominican and Panamanian, and my cousin is African. I want the world to see each other not by the color of their skin but notice each other through similarities, their personality."

A Rainbow of Peace by Justin Raposa

"A world of Nature, Love, Technology, Health, Equality and Family."

Child and Leaf by Nadezhda Ciubotaru

"I want to see a world where we care about nature."

What is the world that you want to see?

Friday, October 27, 2017

6 Steps to 3D Printing an iPod Case Customized with a Hashtag and then Block Printing the Hashtag

1. Create a 3D digital file of a customized iPod case emblazoned with #createataic  This is the hashtag for the Visual and Digital Arts Program at American International College.



2. Create a 3D digital file of reversed and raised type to attach to the case.



3. Using a 3D printer, print the case and raised type.  Insert iPod.



4. Prepare ink for block printing the raised type.


5. Apply ink to the raised type.



6. Press the inked raised type on paper.



The ipod case was 3D printed on our Ultimaker 2 printer, found in our Art and Innovation Lab.

Tuesday, June 13, 2017

Do you like to express your ideas visually? If so, you have found the right place!


Welcome to the Visual and Digital Arts at American International College.  We invite you to scroll down for news about recent events and click on the menu tabs above to learn about the program's core courses and degree offerings.

Come join the fun!

Self-Portrait by Jorangeliz Bermudez-Martinez



AIC Student Artists Raise Over $1,000 for Springfield Homeless Services Agency

Artwork created by American International College students raised a total of $1,025 at the benefit art auction held by Friends of the Homeless.

Friends of the Homeless provides shelter and meals to people in need. They work to find permanent housing for shelter guests and operate 100 units of low-income housing.

According to Sarah Tanner at Friends of the Homeless,

"$1,025 is just about 512 meals, or 28 people in shelter for the evening.

Either way, it has huge ramifications for our ability to serve!"



The art auction included creations by local artists, students and guests of Friends of the Homeless. Each artist created a work that portrayed her or his "Impression of Home."  The artists explored the meaning of home that connects us all.

Portraits of some Friends of the Homeless artists taken by Photo Minor Tiana Powell:

Aidy

John

David

Here is some AIC student art that sold:

Photo and text by Brian Maurer

To me, home is a place where I find comfort and peace. I am from New York City, and I live in the neighborhood of Spanish Harlem. Even though Spanish Harlem is still filled with poverty, and the neighborhood is not the ideal place to be sometimes, I still find it home. Spanish Harlem is where I learned to communicate, I learned to also be more empathetic for others, and most of all, it made me who I am today. To most people, Spanish Harlem is looked as a dangerous area and a place one must not visit, and I completely disagree. Spanish Harlem has culture and is filled with so many unique and kind people. You can really learn a lot living in my neighborhood, even if isn’t in the best condition sometimes.


Photo and text by Ruthlyn Richards

My Impression of Home is this beautiful lake. The calmness of water and evening dawning down surrounded by nature gives the image a more tranquil feeling and reminds of home. Not only my home here, but also back in Jamaica. As the saying goes, “home is were your heart is”. Home for me is a quiet and peaceful place were I unwind from the world. The place I relax after a hard day of work and school and meditate on what’s next. Home is were I can be carefree and not worry about what negativity the world has to offer. Home is my happy place.


Painting and text by Thaleeza Saenz-Flores

"Home is where the love is"

 This painting is used with acrylic paint, a little bit of marker and pen. In the painting, it is meant to show three different types of feeling at home. The first, there is a happy multi-racial family together—young a mother, a young father, and two young children. Their scene is displaying “family time”, the father holding his daughter as the mother plays with her son with planes.

Second there is an old man lying against a wall and around him, there isn't much but a fireplace keeping him and his loyal and loving companion warm--the old man’s expression is not sad, but peaceful one because although he does not have much he has a companion and they are keeping each other warm.

Last but not least is a wooden cabin, in the dark; there is a woman reading peacefully in her home with her cat on her lap. Living by them seems lonely, but the woman seems comfortable, is content being able to live in a small house. She has no family around her, but she is in her comfortable space—on the couch, with her furry companion on her lap and a book in her hands.

In these three different home representations, each person seems to be warm, smiling and joyful in their surroundings.

Home is not being able to live in grand houses or in fancy expensive places but being able to get to a house, filled with comfort, love, safety, and peace. A house can be any shelter; a home is a lucky place you can go to after a long day where the comfort and love is.

Photo and text by Ketirah Felder-Hogan

Homes are often described as a place where we live. Homes are said to be buildings created by multiple walls that are made of bricks and cement. I believe that a “home” could be found through any person, place, or thing. “Home” isn’t necessarily a place you were raised, where you presently live, or even where you will live in the future. A “home” is where you feel love, comfort, joy, and hope. Anyone can find and experience these emotions outside of a typical “home”.

One can get the feelings of love, comfort, joy, and hope through a meaningful object or even through another person as I have displayed in this photograph. This photograph shows two female college roommates holding hands. Each girl has had their fair share of issues like we all have; they are both different in many ways but alike in many more. Like every other college student, they are away from their families and they miss them. They miss the same old people, bedrooms, friends, and neighborhoods they grew up in. These “old” things are the things that have allowed them both to experience love, comfort, joy, and hope at some point in their lives.

Now, that these girls are experiencing a new chapter in their lives, differently it is not to say that this is a time to be sad or distraught. In fact, these two girls have found a friend in one another and a sister in each other during this time. Although they may not be blood they have united together to overcome the feelings of loneliness, doubt, and fear that we all must face in life. “Home”, is not just a roof over one’s head, a home is anywhere you feel ultimate happiness at.

A person’s “home” is not impossible to find, they must search hard enough to find it.

Friday, April 7, 2017

Politics and the Play - Student Art - Beauty That Encourages Thinking

Opening Celebration of Student Art: West Wing Gallery of the Karen Sprague Cultural Arts Center, April 18th, 2017 from 11:00 am to Noon.

The exhibit is a visual portrayal of themes found in the play "Chicago" and our current sociopolitical landscape.

This exhibition connects the Visual and Digital Arts program with the Theater Arts program as students created art that represents concepts from the play "Chicago".

Chicago will be performed in the Griswold Theater: April 21 at 7 p.m., April 22 at 7 p.m., and April 23 at 2 p.m. Address for theater and gallery:  Corner of State and Homer Streets. 1000 State Street, Springfield, MA 01109 

Poster Design: VDA Professor Merrilee Hale

Malaysia Scott - Sociopolitical issue: #blackgirlmagic


























Nick Brown - Sociopolitical issue: Patriotism

Carl Colas - Chicago theme: Style


























Allison Gavin - Sociopolitical issue: Judicial Injustice and Discrimination

Natalija Kruger - Chicago theme: Fame

Tiana Powell - Sociopolitical issue: LGBT Rights

Ryan Lafrance - Sociopolitical issue: Urban Gentrification

Nick Rivera - Sociopolitical issue: Activist Rosa Parks




Siale Alatini - Sociopolitical issue: Plight of Veterans 

Monday, March 27, 2017

Redefining "Nude" with Images and Social Media


AIC Resident Advisor Crystal Mallett organized a recent event that encouraged students to assess the role social media plays in their lives, understand the power of images and to create an expanded definition of the color “nude”.


Social media trends such as #blackgirlmagic (the concept that women of color of any shape and skin tone are beautiful) and #blacklivesmatter (a call to action and response to anti-black racism) inspired Mallett to create the workshop.



At the event in the Campus Center Auditorium, students discussed the pros and cons of social media.
Shannoya Scott, who honors her deceased parents each year on Facebook, described how she has deeply connected with other individuals that read her posts and shared that they had lost parents as well.  Shanell Russo explained that images of perfect models, sometimes Photoshopped beyond reality, fostered insecurity for her.  The question of venting on social media came up as well. Some used social media to vent. Others felt that saying you are upset is okay, but lots of details were unnecessary.


Mallett asked Professor John Nordell to share his views on the importance of images and social media.  He noted that ex-slave and abolitionist Frederick Douglass was the most photographed American in the 19th Century. Striving to counter the racist stereotypes of blacks at the time, Douglass sought out photographers to take his picture and always posed in a manner that conveyed intelligence, strength, pride and determination.


Nordell also mentioned the power of images to change society, such as when images of civil rights protestors in the 1960s being attacked by police spurred other individuals to take action.

The workshop culminated in a photo shoot that created a powerful vision of justice as students dressed in clothes that related to their shade of nude, their skin tone.

Photography Minor Tiana Powell took pictures as the students posed against a neutral grey backdrop that let each skin tone shine.


The beautiful and socially impactful images are making the rounds on social media. By learning from each other and from the past, by understanding the power and importance of images, students made history.