Friday, April 19, 2019

Student Artists Interpret AIC's Motto: Post tenebras lux - After darkness, light

Students from Cultivating Creativity and Digital Photography 1 and 2 created artworks related to aspects of AIC's mission, vision and motto. Students also read Dr. Martin Luther King Junior's speech "I Have a Dream" and then created art based on the imagery Dr. King painted with his powerful words.

We will have an opening celebration of this Freedom of Expression art show in the West Wing Gallery of the Karen Sprague Cultural Arts Center, April 25th, 2019 from 11:00 am to Noon. Refreshments will be served. You are invited to join us!



Ed Ryan created a mini black box theater to portray After darkness, light.  Raising the scrim reveals his painting inside the box.

Photo and Text by Amber Ollari
Though we may have experienced dark times in our educational, personal, and professional lives, there is always a source of light. Those experiences help prepare us for personal fulfillment, professional achievement and civic engagement through educational experiences that transform lives.

Photos by Victoria Perini
This triptych combines three images. With each image, Victoria represented After darkness, light.  Looking from left to right, the overall piece becomes progressively lighter, thus enhancing the concept.  Click on image to enlarge it.

Photo and Text by Alliyah Ramirez
This photo represents the light in my life. In this house I do my bible study. I am able to learn not just about the bible, but myself as well. After a period of darkness, this house became my light.

AIC Student Designers Create Flyers for Freedom of Expression Art Show

Student designers in Professor Jane Janovsky's Graphic Design 1 class created flyers for the upcoming Freedom of Expression Art Show.  We hope you will join us!

By Lui Sitama

By Malik Webb

By Ave Mullen

By Jessie Darnell

By Kelly Shea

Thursday, April 18, 2019

Do you like to express your ideas visually? If so, you have found the right place!


Welcome to the Visual and Digital Arts at American International College.  We invite you to scroll down for news about recent events and click on the menu tabs above to learn about the program's core courses and degree offerings.

Come join the fun!

Self-Portrait by Jorangeliz Bermudez-Martinez

                                                                                                                                                                                                VDA Major Jessie Darnell made this video about our major for a class project in Digital Storytelling.

Wednesday, April 3, 2019

Need: Hooks for Hanging a Thin Painting. Solution: Fabricate with a 3D Printer

We had a thin painting to exhibit on the wall.  The canvas board was too thin to screw in hook eyes to attach mounting wire.



Visual and Digital Arts Major Margarita designed some hooks and then printed them on our  3D printers.


Voila!



Thursday, November 15, 2018

Lights! Action! Art! - Images of "Noises Off" Concepts and MLK's "I Have a Dream" Speech

Opening Celebration of Student Art: West Wing Gallery of the Karen Sprague Cultural Arts Center, November 27th, 2018 from 11:00 am to 12:15.  Refreshments will be served.  You are invited to join us!

This exhibition connects the Visual and Digital Arts program with the Theater Arts program as students created art that represents concepts from the play  "Noises Off".  Performance dates for the play: Friday, November 30 and Saturday, December 1, 2018 at 7 p.m. and Sunday, December 2, 2018 at 2 p.m. 


Noises Off Concept:
Performance by Olivier Georges
Noises Off Concept:
Frustration by Don Drew
Student artists also read Dr. Martin Luther King Junior's speech "I Have a Dream" and then created art based on the imagery Dr. King painted with his powerful words.  And, some photography students explored the question: Are Photographs Truth?

COM major Ketirah Felder-Hogan wrote an appreciation  her classmates' creations:

From my Cultivating Creativity course these are three visual artist representations of the “I Have a Dream” speech concepts that I thoroughly enjoyed.  I loved how all three artworks all conveyed very similar yet different messages.  As a whole, each art work talks about race, but they all pinpoint different aspects within racism.  For example, the first image by Margarita Velazco represents colorism, and how in some cases siblings may look different but they are still related and they are very beautiful despite their differences in skin tone.

I Have a Dream Concept:
My Beautiful Twin Sister by Margaria Velazco
The next artwork done by fellow classmate Lui Sitama puts a different and unique spin on what Martin Luther King wanted to come from his activism and his speech:  opportunity for African-Americans in America.  I love the way Lui represents this concept by creating a check which I felt was a very compelling yet simple art choice.

I Have a Dream Concept:
A Check for Their Freedom by Lui Sitama
The last art work comes from another one of my classmates Ronneisha Lendon, who used birds to represent both white and black people in America.  I loved the showcase of life and freedom in America when it comes each particular race, especially the intricate detail of the chain being attached to the black bird.  I find these three paintings done by my classmates very eye-opening, yet interesting and enjoyable.

I Have a Dream Concept:
Free by Roneisha
(Ketirah also works as tech in the COM Department MacLab.  She penned this reflection on making prints of student photographs for the exhibition.)

The first image, taken by Samira Abdul-Karim, was a picture that I loved for its clarity.  When it came to printing out this picture, aside from some minor editing, there was not much for me to do. All I had to do was slightly lower the brightness of the image and sharpen small areas.  This picture was very clean, clear, and bright, and that made me enjoy printing it out.

I Have a Dream Concept:
"With this faith we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation, into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood."
By Samira Abdul-Karim
The second picture, photographed by Dan Blouin, was also an image I enjoyed printing.  The focus of the picture was pretty clear and in focus.  The only thing I had to edit was the brightness, which I heightened a little bit.

Are Photographs Truth?
Photographs are truth because when you capture an image that subject is actually there. You cannot take a photo of something that doesn't exist. To make a photo not truthful you would need to alter it in some way, such as Photoshop.
By Dan Blouin
Lastly, the third image I printed was by Tia Caulton.  When I first saw this image, it was a bit intimidating.  This image has a lot of detail and I did not want to brighten it or sharpen to it.  I did not want the image to look muddled.  Instead I just brightened the image slightly.  I thoroughly enjoyed these images and found them enjoyable to print.  I was captivated by them.

Are Photographs Truth?
This photograph shows a not-truth. Everything about the photo is manipulated, including the color, the staging and the planning of the photo before it was shot.
By Tia Caulton

Visual and Digital Arts Major Ethan Murray created this exhibition poster for his Graphic Design class.



Saturday, June 23, 2018

3D Printed Cultural Objects Designed by AIC Students to be Exhibited at Construct 3D in Atlanta

Students in the VDA course Art and Culture: A Global Look received a two-part assignment:

Part 1. Design a cultural object.

Part 2. Go to Tinkercad.com and create a 3D model of the cultural object you designed.

After assigning these projects, Professor John Nordell learned that in response to the absolute lack of cultural objects found on major online sites for 3D designs, the #0Things project was launched. The initiative encourages students to design artifacts that represent who they are and where they are from.

The #0Things cultural objects will be 3D printed and exhibited at Construct 3D 2018 in Atlanta, GA

Alli Gavin with the Celtic Cross pendant she designed.

A 3D print, designed with details to look ancient, honors Alli's Irish roots.

Of Pacific Islander heritage, Kayla Clark designed this Shark Tooth pendant.  Click on the triangle to view in three dimensions.  Then, click and drag with your mouse to see various angles. Scroll to zoom in and out.


Shark Tooth Pendant by Kayla Clark

Ethan Murray designed this object in order represent two aspects of his culture: baseball and the 2nd Amendment.

America's Pastimes by Ethan Murray


Love is in the Air - VDA Major Katelynn Leclerc Turns Pro

Visual & Digital Arts major and rising junior Katelynn Leclerc sees professional photography in her future after graduation.  The dream has begun to manifest as she recently completed paid photo and video shoots for members of the AIC community.  If you have photography needs, she can be reached via email: katelynn.leclerc@aic.edu



Aubera Allyssa and Peter Walsh get engaged!


Congratulations to Courtney and Ryan Albee!